A Lost Modernist Manifesto, or: S. S. Van Dine’s Rules for Detective Fiction

We’re apparently on the theme of “genre” this week! This post is about how the “detective fiction” genre was defined in the twentieth century (more or less). Folks who are dedicated fans or critics of detective fiction have probably heard of S.S. Van Dine, the pseudonym of an American detective fiction writer who was popular … Continue reading A Lost Modernist Manifesto, or: S. S. Van Dine’s Rules for Detective Fiction

Disclosure: Why am I writing about this topic?

Why am I writing about this topic? I recently completed a PhD in literary studies, and nearing the end of that long research and writing project, I came across what I have come to call “tropes of white womanhood” that were circulated within and between European and North American societies (my focus was mainly on … Continue reading Disclosure: Why am I writing about this topic?

True Crime Burnout, or: Monetize that Sh*

I’m reading a fascinating book about True Crime and digital media engagement by Tanya Horeck (who probably has my dream job and whose work I wish I’d come across earlier in my PhD career), and I’ll definitely be dipping into parts of it on this blog, but this early tidbit stood out to me as … Continue reading True Crime Burnout, or: Monetize that Sh*

Our relationship to True Crime is an enduring one

Our relationship to true crime is an enduring one. We know this for a fact because culture gets recorded in various media, and it is the work of some professionals to examine media from the past for what it tells us about us, our pasts, and -- importantly -- sometimes about our present.* I brought … Continue reading Our relationship to True Crime is an enduring one