Local Color and Cultural Representation: A Round-up on HBO’s ‘Mare of Easttown’

I’m going to do another round-up of writing I think is worth it on a current #crime thing. This week, everyone is talking about HBO’s Mare of Easttown, with Kate Winslet in the lead, surrounded by a fantastic cast, including Jean Smart as Mare’s mom, Julianne Nicholson as Mare’s best friend Lori, and Guy Pearce … Continue reading Local Color and Cultural Representation: A Round-up on HBO’s ‘Mare of Easttown’

What I’m Reading: May Update

Whoops, looks like I had a busy April and did not do a reading update. I'm still working my way through Sierra Crane Murdoch's Yellow Bird and Louise Erdrich's The Round House. Both of these books navigate the complicated and blurred lines between federal, state, and tribal jurisdictions and traditions. One is non-fiction and the … Continue reading What I’m Reading: May Update

Edmond Locard’s “Exchange Principle”

Edmond Locard (1877-1966) was a French criminologist and is considered the “father of forensic science.” His most famous legacy is probably “Locard’s Exchange Principle,” which is the basic notion that “Every contact leaves a trace.” More specifically, whenever two objects come into contact, there is always a transfer of material. This principle is a foundation … Continue reading Edmond Locard’s “Exchange Principle”

How important is DNA collection after all? A look at Sameena Mulla’s ‘Violence of Care’

Earlier this month I posted a reading list that I’ve been working on, which included Sameena Mulla’s The Violence of Care. I want to focus on one particular chapter from that book that really resonated with some other things I’ve been reading and re-watching, namely the Netflix mini-series Unbelievable and the nonfiction reporting the series … Continue reading How important is DNA collection after all? A look at Sameena Mulla’s ‘Violence of Care’

Why is the spy trade so white and male? (and RIP John Le Carre)

Why is the spy genre -- in nonfiction history and journalism as well as in fiction -- so male and so white? I found myself wondering this recently while reading Broker, Trader, Lawyer, Spy: The Secret World of Corporate Espionage (2010, Harper Collins), by Eamon Javers. It’s a good book: generally well researched and well … Continue reading Why is the spy trade so white and male? (and RIP John Le Carre)

Who is the “Lady Detective” on the cover art?

It’s time to talk about the image I use here on my blog and on my Twitter profile: the book cover for Revelations of a Lady Detective. And, by the way, happy International Women's Day! According to Dagni A. Breseden, professor of Victorian Literature at Eastern Illinois University, there is an unsettled debate about which … Continue reading Who is the “Lady Detective” on the cover art?

The Valhalla Murders, My Favorite Murder Podcast, and Paranoid/Reparative Engagement with True Crime and Crime Fiction

I recently watched the Icelandic police procedural series, The Valhalla Murders (2019, 2020). It is loosely based on a national scandal from the 1940s about a state institution for troubled boys who, after being put in state care, suffered abuse at the hands of staff, according to this MEAWW article. The Nordic Noir series re-imagines … Continue reading The Valhalla Murders, My Favorite Murder Podcast, and Paranoid/Reparative Engagement with True Crime and Crime Fiction